Syllabus

English 1302: Composition & Rhetoric II


Dr. Mark Womack Spring 2013
ask@drmarkwomack.com drmarkwomack.com/engl-1302
Division Office:
CASA 114 / 832.482.1053
Conference Hours:
M/W 9:00-10:00 (& by appointment)

Time Section Room Credit Prerequisites
MWF 7:00-7:55 5002 CASA 331 3 hours Passing grade in
ENGL 1301
MWF 8:05-9:00 5004 CASA 331


Course Description

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Course Learning Outcomes for English 1301

  • Demonstrate knowledge of individual and collaborative research processes.
  • Develop ideas and synthesize primary and secondary sources within focused academic arguments, including one or more research-based essays.
  • Analyze, interpret, and evaluate a variety of texts for ethical and logical use of evidence.
  • Write in a style that clearly communicates meaning, builds credibility, and inspires belief or action.
  • Apply the conventions of style manuals for specific academic disciplines (e.g., APA, CMS, MLA, etc.).

Required Textbooks

Portable Legacies
(2nd Edition)
Jan Z. Schmidt & Lynne Crockett
A Writer’s Reference
(7th Edition)
Diana Hacker & Nancy Sommers

Additional Materials

  • in-class writing tools (pen/pencil & paper)
  • a two-pocket folder (for submitting your revised essays)
  • a stapler


Instructor Policies

Attendance

You should attend all of every class. Failure to attend constitutes grounds for failing the course; if you miss nine days of class or more, you will receive an “F.” I make no distinction between “excused” and “unexcused” absences; an absence is an absence. I assign no grade penalty for your first two absences; starting on your third absence, however, each day you miss will reduce your final average by one point. (Three tardies equal one absence. Leaving class before I dismiss you counts as two tardies.) I take role at the beginning of each class session; if you arrive after role call, check in with me at the end of class. It is your responsibility to find out, from your classmates, what you missed if you were not in class.

Writing Assignments

You will write three critical essays, with required rough drafts and peer reviews for each; the third essay will be in lieu of a final exam. You will also write twelve Reading Journal entries to help you plan your essays; Journal entries will receive either an S (Satisfactory) or a U (Unsatisfactory). You must hand in assignments to me at the beginning of class on the day they are due. Papers not submitted directly to me will not receive grades. I do not accept late papers. I never assign extra credit or make-up work. I discuss grades only in private, and only forty-eight hours (at least) after I have returned an assignment.

Quizzes

I will frequently give a five minute pop quiz on the day’s reading assignment at either the beginning or the end of class; if you miss that five minutes of a class, you miss that quiz. I never, under any circumstances whatsoever, give “make up” quizzes. But when calculating your quiz average, I will drop your two lowest quiz scores. (You can count on some vocabulary questions on the quizzes, so look up the meaning of any unfamiliar word you encounter in the readings.)

Academic Integrity Policy

If I find clear evidence of academic dishonesty for ANY assignment, I will record a 0 (0 points) for the assignment. If a second incident of academic dishonesty occurs, I will record an “F” for the course grade.

Professionalism

I will frequently give a five minute pop quiz on the day’s reading assignment at either the beginning or the end of class; if you miss that five minutes of a class, you miss that quiz. I never, under any circumstances whatsoever, give “make up” quizzes. But when calculating your quiz average, I will drop your two lowest quiz scores. (You can count on some vocabulary questions on the quizzes, so look up the meaning of any unfamiliar word you encounter in the readings.)

Cell Phones

You may not use cell phones in class. Keep your cell phone turned off and out of sight from the moment you enter the classroom until the moment you leave. Every time I see or hear your cell phone in class, I will deduct 5 points from your final average. I also reserve the right to confiscate any cell phone visible in class and to answer or confiscate any cell phone that rings during class. (Notify me before class begins if there is an emergency situation that absolutely requires you to leave your cell phone on.)

Laptops/Tablets

You may use your laptop or tablet computer only for taking notes, accessing the class website, or other specifically class-related work. If you use it to IM, e-mail, play games, shop or any other such activity during class, you forfeit your right to bring the device to class for the rest of the semester. I reserve the right to confiscate any laptop or tablet used inappropriately during class.

Manuscript Requirements

Make and keep a copy of every journal, essay, draft, and peer review you submit. Print out your final drafts on 8 ½ x 11 inch paper. Use 1 inch margins, double space, paginate, and staple pages together. (I will not accept, read, or grade any unstapled papers). Use only 12 point fonts and readable typefaces (such as Times New Roman or Georgia). Always print with a good ink cartridge to ensure legibility. I will not grade papers I consider illegible. Edit and proofread everything you turn in; every assignment should be as error-free as you can make it.

Website

All course materials—including the policy statement, the syllabus, assignment sheets, and so on—are available on the class website: http://drmarkwomack.com/engl-1302/.


Assignments Weight
Quizzes 10%
Reading Journals 20%
Essay 1: Short Story 20%
Essay 2: Explication 25%
Essay 3: Sonnet 25%


Numerical Values of Letter Grades
A+ (100-97) A (96-93) A- (92-90)
B+ (89-87) B (86-83) B- (82-80)
C+ (79-77) C (76-73) C- (72-70)
D (69-60)
F (59-0)


Schedule of Readings & Assignments

DATE READINGS ASSIGNMENTS
M 1/14 Review of instructions, policies, & syllabus
W 1/16 “Elements of Fiction” Portable Legacies (PL) 902-07 Diagnostic Paragraph
F 1/18 “A&P” PL 87-91
“Reading to Form an Interpretation” A Writer’s Reference (WR) L1
Signed & Dated Course Contract
M 1/21 MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY
W 1/23 “Hills Like White Elephants” & “Eveline” PL 525-32
“Planing the Paper” WR L2
Short Story Journal 1
F 1/25 “The Man I Killed” & “Good Form” PL 748-51
“Writing the Paper” WR L3
M 1/28 “A Good Man is Hard to Find” PL 760-70 Short Story Journal 2
W 1/30 “A Rose for Emily” PL 302-07 Short Story Journal 3
F 2/1 “Observing the Conventions”
& “Integrating Quotations” WR L4-L5
M 2/4 Outline Workshop
“Planing” & “Drafting” WR C1-C2
Short Story Journal 4
W 2/6 “Documenting Sources” WR MLA-4
F 2/8 Peer Review Workshop Essay 1 Draft
M 2/11 “Revising” WR C3 Return Reviews
W 2/13 “Active Verbs” WR W3
F 2/15 Revision Conferences—7:00AM to 10:00AM
M 2/18 “Elements of Drama” PL 936-41 Essay 1
W 2/20 Sure Thing PL 627-36
F 2/22 Antony & Cleopatra (2.2.201-28) Explication Journal 1
M 2/25 Macbeth (5.5.1-29)
W 2/27 The Merchant of Venice (4.1.70-83) Explication Journal 2
W 3/1 Twelfth Night (1.5.253-65)
M 3/4 As You Like It (2.7.138-65) Explication Journal 3
W 3/6 Romeo & Juliet (Prologue.1-14)
F 3/8 Trifles PL 617-26
SPRING BREAK: March 11 to March 17
M 3/18 Outline Workshop Explication Journal 4
W 3/20 “Wordy Sentences”
& “Exact Language” WR W2 & W5
F 3/22 Peer Review Workshop Essay 2 Draft
M 3/25 “Sentence Fragments”
& “Run-on Sentences” WR G5 & G6
Return Reviews
W 3/27 Revision Conferences—7:00AM to 10:00AM
W 3/29 SPRING HOLIDAY
M 4/1 “Elements of Poetry” PL 911-19 Essay 2
W 4/3 “Structure”
& Shakespeare’s Sonnets PL 920-24 & 580-81
Sonnet
Journal 1
F 4/5 “Using Secondary Sources” WR L-6
Last Day to Drop & Receive a “W”
M 4/8 “To His Coy Mistress” PL 584-85 Sonnet
Journal 2
W 4/10 “The Flea” PL 598-99 Sonnet
Journal 3
F 4/12 “Supporting A Thesis”
& “Integrating Sources” WR MLA-1 & MLA-2
M 4/15 Outline Workshop Sonnet
Journal 4
W 4/17 “A Valediction Forbiding Mourning” PL 582-83
F 4/19 Peer Review Workshop Essay 3 Draft
M 4/22 Bring draft and WR to class Return Reviews
W 4/24 “Musée des Beaux Arts” PL 771-72
F 4/26 Revision Conferences—7:00AM to 10:00AM
M 4/29 Bring draft and WR to class
W 5/1 Bring draft and WR to class
F 5/3 Essay 3


Grading Criteria for Essays
A
  • Original and interesting thesis
  • Well-structured argument
  • Lots of convincing evidence
  • Lucid prose style
B
  • Workable thesis
  • Well-structured argument
  • Good supporting evidence
  • Decent prose style
C
  • Obvious and boring thesis
  • Coherent argument
  • Some supporting evidence
  • Correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation

OR Relies too heavily on plot summary and paraphrase

D At least ONE of the following:

  • No discernible thesis
  • Incoherent argument
  • Little or no supporting evidence
  • Incorrect grammar, spelling, and punctuation
F TWO or more of the following:

  • No discernible thesis
  • Incoherent argument
  • Little or no supporting evidence
  • Incorrect grammar, spelling, and punctuation

OR Fails to meet basic requirements for the assignment


Lone Star College-CyFair
Campus and System Policies

Lone Star College-CyFair and its English department require me to include a 1,938 word-long list of information, regulations, and official policies in my syllabus.

The latest version of that list is available HERE.


Your instructor, Mark Womack, reserves the right to amend any policies listed here with sufficient written and verbal notice.

Page Last Updated: 12 January 2013